Districts, Restaurants

Seafood Restaurants By District

Everyone knows you can get great seafood at Fisherman’s Wharf. The wharf is home to restaurants like the venerable Scoma’s, family owned and operated since 1965 when brothers Al and Joe Scoma turned the hidden local hang-out into one of the nation’s highest grossing independent restaurants, and Fog Harbor Fish House at PIER 39 where you enjoy spectacular views of San Francisco Bay and the Golden Gate Bridge while dining on the freshest 100% sustainable seafood and choosing from an extensive wine list. But you can get great seafood in all of San Francisco’s unique neighborhoods.

Embarcadero

In the downtown area, close to the Ferry Building on The Embarcadero, you find La Mar Cevicheria Peruana serving a variety of ceviche, the Peruvian style cevicheria and the best Pisco Sour in town. At the Ferry Building, San Francisco’s Foodie Mecca, you will have to wait until Spring 2014 for Hog Island Oyster Bar to reopen in its expanded location.

Union Square

Move on to Union Square and dine at Farallon. Named for the islands off the coast of San Francisco, Farallon’s décor resembles your underwater fantasy, while the menu features coastal cuisine. Pass over through Union Square and over Nob Hill and stop into Swan’s Oyster Depot. This establishment is over 100 years old, is basically a hole in the wall with 20 stools and serves lunch only since they close at 5:30PM

SOMA

SOMA (South of Market) offers Anchor & Hope Restaurant, an oyster bar and fish house located in a renovated, 100 year old brick building, formerly the studio of sculptor Benny Bufano. Anchor & Hope offers the warmth of an Eastern Seaboard fish house with dishes such as a memorable lobster roll and petrale sole. For those craving sushi, Sanraku Metreon is tucked into Yerba Buena Gardens, located inside the Metreon in SOMA, just a short walk from several of SF’s best museums, the Moscone Center, Imax and other movies.

Pacific Heights

Visit tony Pacific Heights and stop by the Elite Café, housed in the beautiful original Art Deco building which began as the Lincoln Grill in 1928. Since 1981, it has been The Elite Cafe. Since its inception, serving exquisite food with the flavors of New Orleans. Or, wander into Woodhouse Fish Co. , which describes itself and “an American Seafood Restaurant” and does not take reservations.

Mission District

Situated in the vibrant Mission district, the inviting Mission Street Oyster Bar and Seafood Restaurant serves several varieties of oysters and generous portions of the freshest fare from the sea. The Mission is also home to Local’s Corner, a raw bar and seafood restaurant, serving only local and sustainably caught fish.

Conclusion

Although a restaurant may not have the word “seafood” in their name, most restaurants serving “American” or ‘California” cuisine have fresh seafood dishes on the menu.